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Benjamin James
Benjamin James

Banded Palm Civet ((LINK))



The banded palm civet (Hemigalus derbyanus), also called banded civet, is a viverrid native to Myanmar, Peninsular Malaysia, peninsular Thailand and the Sunda Islands of Sipura, Sumatra and Borneo. It is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List because of its large geographic and elevation range and tolerance to some habitat disturbance.[2]




banded palm civet



The banded palm civet has a long pointed face, reminiscent of insectivorous mammals.[5] It has a long body set on short legs, and five toes on each foot with retractable claws. It looks very similar to Owston's palm civet (Chrotogale owstoni), except that it lacks spots on its body, and the hair on its neck points upwards instead of down along the neck. It is also similar to the rare Hose's palm civet (Diplogale hosei), an endemic of northern Borneo - they only differ in shape of muzzle and teeth and Hose's civet does not have the banded pelage of the banded civet. The banded civet has short, dense fur that is generally a dark cream/buff color with four to five dark bands on its back. Its tail has two dark bands and the latter half of the tail is dark brown to black. There is a dark brown stripe that extends down the length of the top of the muzzle, and two stripes that extend from the top middle of the eye to the inside corner of the ears. There are two areas of white above and below each eye, and the muzzle is darker than the rest of the face.[6]


The kingdom the Banded Palm Civet belongs to is Animalia with Mammalia as the class. The family these Civets belong to is Viverridae, which includes several other types of civets, the binturong, several types of genets, the Central African Oyan, and the West African Oyan.


These civets sleep in caves, holes in trees, and other dark places during the day. They are solitary animals who are also highly territorial. Despite sleeping in holes they find in trees, they are a ground-dwelling animal. They are also secretive and relatively ferocious wild animals.


The Banded Palm Civet is a carnivore, and therefore, it mainly survives on a diet based on meat, but it does eat plants and fruit on occasion. They will eat rodents, lizards, frogs, insects, earthworms, and small snakes. They will also eat spiders, ants, snails, locusts, and crustaceans found in their territory. They also eat flowers and fruits from mangoes, palm trees, and coffee plants. They also occasionally eat bananas.


The natural predators of the banded civet include crocodiles, large snakes, some Bengal Tigers, and leopards. Bengal Tigers can climb trees, but they hardly ever do so, except when the cubs are young. Leopards love being high up and will even eat their food in trees. Leopards also hunt exclusively at night, which is when the Banded Palm Civet is most active.


The pregnancy of a Banded Palm Civet lasts anywhere from 32 to 64 days. These civets typically give birth to one or two babies that are deaf, blind, and completely helpless at the time of birth. Eighteen days after the babies are born, they have already learned to walk, and by four weeks of age, they already know how to climb trees, a useful survival skill.


The decline in the population of Banded Palm Civets, over 30% in the last 15 years, is why they are listed as vulnerable. Throughout its native habitat, these civets are protected in Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Myanmar, and Indonesia.


The Banded palm civet (Hemigalus derbyanus) is a viverrid found in Southeast Asia. It is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List because of its large geographic and elevation range and tolerance to some habitat disturbance.


The Banded palm civet has a long pointed face, reminiscent of insectivorous mammals. It has a long body set on short legs, and five toes on each foot with retractable claws. The Banded civet has short, dense fur that is generally a dark cream/buff color with four to five dark bands on its back. Its tail has two dark bands and the latter half of the tail is dark brown to black. There is a dark brown stripe that extends down the length of the top of the muzzle, and two stripes that extend from the top middle of the eye to the inside corner of the ears. There are two areas of white above and below each eye, and the muzzle is darker than the rest of the face.


Banded palm civets are native to Myanmar, Peninsular Malaysia, peninsular Thailand, and the Sunda Islands of Sipura, Sumatra, and Borneo. They inhabit tropical moist forests, and montane forests and can often be found in plantations.


Banded palm civets lead a solitary and secretive lifestyle. During the day they sleep in their nests in trees and at night come down to forage on the forest floor. Banded palm civets are territorial animals; they mark their territory with scents and defend it aggressively from intruders.


From the few banded civets observed in captivity, they usually give birth to one or two litters, which weigh about 125 grams. These litters usually open their eyes after 8 to 12 days and nurse for about 70 days before eating solid food.


Distinctive for its tan and black-striped coat, the banded palm civet (Hemigalus derbyanus) is a rare species of viverrid inhabiting southeast Asia, specifically the Sundaic region. Threatened mostly by hunting, the banded palm civet is currently listed as a vulnerable species by the IUCN.


See the fact file below for more information on the banded palm civet or alternatively, you can download our 19-page Banded Palm Civet worksheet pack to utilise within the classroom or home environment.


This is a fantastic bundle which includes everything you need to know about the banded palm civet across 19 in-depth pages. These are ready-to-use Banded Palm Civet worksheets that are perfect for teaching students about the banded palm civet (Hemigalus derbyanus) which is a rare species of viverrid inhabiting southeast Asia, specifically the Sundaic region. Threatened mostly by hunting, the banded palm civet is currently listed as a vulnerable species by the IUCN.


The banded palm civet (Hemigalus derbyanus), also called the banded civet, is a civet found in the Sundaic region and occurs in peninsular Myanmar, peninsular Malaysia, peninsular Thailand and in Indonesia on the islands of Sipura, Sumatra and Borneo. It is listed as Vulnerable because of an ongoing population decline, estimated to be more than 30% over the last three generations, inferred from over-exploitation, decline in habitat quality, and habitat destruction and degradation.


The Banded Palm Civet (Hemigalus derbyanus) is a civet that is distributed throughout the Sundaic region. While they mostly live in forests, they spend much of their time on the ground. Reminiscent of insectivorous mammals, the Banded Palm Civet has a long pointed face. The body is long with short legs, and they have five toes on each foot with retractable claws. Their dark cream to buff colored fur is short and dense with four to five dark bands on their backs. As carnivores, they eat earthworms, insects, and other small animals.


Another exciting Nashville Zoo birth was a male banded palm civet born Sept. 1. The single offspring marks the first successful birth of a banded palm civet at an AZA accredited zoo in the past decade. Cincinnati Zoo is the only other zoo in North America housing this species.


Banded Palm CivetNameBanded Palm CivetScientific NameHemigalus derbyanusContinentAsiaDietOmnivoreStatusNear ThreatenedThe banded palm civet, also called banded civet, is a viverrid native to Myanmar, Peninsular Malaysia, peninsular Thailand and the Sunda Islands of Sipura, Sumatra and Borneo.


Banded palm civets (Hemigalus derbyanus) look like a across between a rat and a weasel, but they are actually in a group of their own, which includes the linsang and binturong. Banded palm civets are solitary night hunters. Because their teeth are tiny they can only eat small prey, mostly insects, worms, and crustaceans.


Banded Civet has been found at elevations up to 1,660 m (WWF-Malaysia pers. comm. 2014). Most records traced by Jennings et al. (2013) were from below 900 m, although this could simply reflect low survey effort at higher elevations within most of its range. Where effort has been made in high-elevation areas it has been found to occur commonly well over 900 m. For example, in Crocker Range National Park, Sabah, Malaysia, it was detected at 75% of camera-trap stations and was the second-most frequently recorded civet; camera-traps in this survey were set between 383 and 1,452 m a.s.l. with 66% of them above 900 m a.s.l. (A.J. Hearn, J. Ross and D.W. Macdonald pers. comm. 2015). At high elevations in the Kelabit Highlands, Sarawak and the Ulu Baram, Sarawak, Banded Civet was the most frequently recorded civet; at high elevations in the Ulu Padas, Sabah, it was the most frequently recorded carnivore (J. Brodie et al. pers. comm. 2014). Banded Civet has been recorded in primary forest (e.g., Wells et al. 2005, Chutipong et al. 2014), logged forest (e.g., Brodie and Giordano 2011, Wilting et al. 2010, Mathai et al. 2010, Hedges et al. 2013) and infrequently from oil palm plantations (A.J. Hearn and J. Ross pers. comm. 2014; Yue et al. in prep.) and acacia plantation landscapes (Belden et al. 2007), but abundance is likely to be lower in modified habitat (Brodie et al. 2014a,b). In Sabah it was shown that its proportion of area occupied was greatly affected by the past logging histories and the species was distributed much more widely and was recorded more often in less disturbed, well managed forest reserves than in forests where conventional logging had caused greater disturbance (Sollmann et al. in prep).It is nocturnal (Lekagul and McNeely 1977, Ross et al. in prep. b). Davis (1962) found in Borneo that over 90% of its diet was insects, and no analysed stomach contents contained fruit or leaves.(c) IUCN 041b061a72


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